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By Sarah Tapscott ’15

In July 2017 I had the opportunity to go to Dublin, Ireland for a week and sing at Christ Church Cathedral with the Choral Arts Society of Frederick, directed by Hood’s choir director, Lynn Staininger. We were invited by MCI (Music Celebrations International), which provides opportunities for musical performances around the world! I love to travel and hadn’t gone to Europe since my freshman year at Hood, so I knew I had to go! What made this experience special was the ability to share it with fellow Hood alumni in Choral Arts. Of the thirty-five vocalists that went, five amazing Hood alum women sang alongside me: Marivic Sison ’94, M.A.’00, Michelle Sison ’97, Jessica Kehler Miller ’11, Meghan Tomlin ’11, and Jordan Garvey ’14. Even my boyfriend, Owen Rosier ’16, came along to experience it with us!

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By Abraham Kettor ’19

In his famous inaugural address, President John F. Kennedy stated, “Ask not what your country can do for you–ask what you can do for your country.” So, as a native of the Republic of Liberia, West Africa, I decided to get out of my comfort zone and go back to my home country with the hope of inspiring other youths to take on peace initiatives and to seek higher education. Of course, this decision wasn’t easy. However, I was prompted to take on this challenge because I have experienced the horror brought on by Civil Wars in Liberia. As a result, I have developed a unique perspective towards life, which inspired me to focus on spreading awareness about love, peace, unity and hope instead of war, hate, intolerance and tribal discrimination. Therefore, when I learned about the Davis Projects for Peace, I knew it would be an exceptional platform for me to step out of my comfort zone.

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Adventures of an Idalionite: My Final Week in Cyprus

By Bethany Montague ’18

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Post One: Can You Dig It? An Archaeology Student’s Adventures in Cyprus
Post Two: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Two in Cyprus
Post Three: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Three in Cyprus
Post Four: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Four in Cyprus
Post Five: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Five in Cyprus

This week was spent closing up the site of Lower City South at Idalion. After 25 years of digging, the sites time has finally come to an end. While we are walking away from the site, we want to protect and record as much information as possible so that if archaeologists come back one day in the future they can know as much as we do now. To achieve this, we drew walls and baulks, took measurements on the walls and various stones, covered some walls and structures with mesh, and then covered them in dirt. We also backfilled pits and trenches after filling them with tarp. The process was long and exhausting, but it’s good to know that the site is somewhat protected.

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Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Five in Cyprus

By Bethany Montague ’18

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Post One: Can You Dig It? An Archaeology Student’s Adventures in Cyprus
Post Two: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Two in Cyprus
Post Three: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Three in Cyprus
Post Four: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Four in Cyprus

This week was our final week of digging. It was a fun week, but also a sad one. I constantly changed trenches this week as we scrambled to finish all of our digging projects. I started the week by finishing the dog skeleton, and then moved back to cistern. Connor and I worked together to try and get out as much dirt as possible, but we still couldn’t get half way through the fill. We were covered in dirt and sweat by the end, but it was a ton of fun. From there, I worked with Becca on a small baulk, which we finished in two days, and then took out a whole area of soft fill soil in a trench in a day. It was down to the last minute, but we were able to finish everything in time.

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Some students are getting a jump on their future this summer as participants in Hood’s Summer Research Institute. The SRI is a competitive program which allows selected students to work one-on-one with a faculty adviser on a research project. Students are provided free housing and a stipend while they conduct research in the laboratory or in the field for eight weeks. Pictured: Gianfranco Portuondo ’18 and Erin George, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics.

By Gianfranco Portuondo ’18

This summer Dr. George and I are studying the effects of monetary policy on job flows. Monetary policy is the tool that the central bank (the Federal Reserve) uses to maintain a stable economy. The central bank’s main monetary policy tool is changing the interest rate. The interest rate affects investment which in turn affects the number of jobs in an economy. The Federal Reserve has a dual mandate of maintaining stable employment and maintaining price stability.

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Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Four in Cyprus

By Bethany Montague ’18

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Post One: Can You Dig It? An Archaeology Student’s Adventures in Cyprus
Post Two: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Two in Cyprus
Post Three: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Three in Cyprus

This week was possibly the most exciting week of my archaeological career. While working on the baulk with Becca, we uncovered a dog skull, which turned out to be a whole dog skeleton. Unfortunately, we didn’t realize it was a full dog until we removed the skull, but nonetheless the whole experience was very exciting. It has always been a dream of mine to excavate a skeleton and Becca was more than happy to let me work on the dog. It was a very slow, tedious project, but worth it. I had to use dental picks to remove dirt carefully around the skeleton, and then use small paintbrushes to sweep up the dirt.

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Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Three in Cyprus

By Bethany Montague ’18

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Post One: Can You Dig It? An Archaeology Student’s Adventures in Cyprus
Post Two: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Two in Cyprus

One would think that digging floors would be fun. One would be wrong. I spent the majority of my work this week removing floors and subfloors from my baulk. It is a very slow, tedious, repetitious process. When you first find the floor, you have to sweep, take pictures, and elevations. After that you can excavate the floor, but once it is gone, you have to repeat the same process with the subfloor. Once you remove the subfloor, you must repeat the process again. If you’re lucky, there won’t be any more floors, but if you’re me, you’ll have floors on floors on floors.

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Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Two in Cyprus

By Bethany Montague ’18

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Post One: Can You Dig It? An Archaeology Student’s Adventures in Cyprus

Just when I thought that it couldn’t get any hotter here, the island had to prove me wrong. This past week, it was at least 130 degrees in the sun every day, and 115 in the shade. Because of this we started going out into the field from 5:30 a.m. to noon, and then spent the rest of the evening at base. It wasn’t until Thursday that the weather calmed down.

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Amanda Shaffery '15 drawing with Tim Buttram of the University of New Hampshire in the trench in 2013.
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Ross drawing in the trench last week.
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Drone photo of the site taken in 2014, with the Byzantine material at the top and the trench just below.
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Ross and Mary Jean Hughes '08 in 2005, the first year she dug in the trench.
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By Jennifer Ross, Ph.D., Professor of Art and Archaeology

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Part One: Another Year, Another Dig: Archaeology Professor Jennifer Ross Writes from Turkey
Part Two: Good Teamwork, Good Archaeology: Professor Jennifer Ross Writes from Turkey
Part Three: Ethics and Archaeology: Professor Jennifer Ross Writes from Turkey

I’ve been supervising work in the same trench at Çadır Höyük since 2005. It’s about 10 by 8 meters (33 by 26 feet) in size, and has now been dug to over 5 meters (16 feet) in depth. I didn’t do all of that, but I’ve been here for the majority of the work in this particular location.

Archaeologists choose places to dig for a variety of different reasons. Our site was thought to be at risk of flooding in the 1990s when the Turkish government put in a new dam far down our valley. The government therefore asked our team—led at the time by Dr. Ron Gorny of the University of Chicago—to retrieve whatever data they could before the site was submerged. But while we’ve had water come close to the base of the site, the current lake edge is several kilometers away, and we’ve therefore been able to continue digging for all this time.

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By Callie Fishburn ’18

Walking down the main gravel road of Eckley Coal Miner’s Village, you feel as if you’ve been transported to the 1800s. Located in Northeastern Pennsylvania, about 2.5 hours north of Frederick, the village of Eckley is lined with houses that have been carefully maintained to accurately reflect their appearance 200 years ago, cars are forbidden to park on the main road, and all utilities and power lines have been covered up or buried underground. And the village is not merely a replica; it was a lively, working coal mining until the mid-1900s, and in fact a handful of people still live there today.

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