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Q&A with Scott Pincikowski

Time at Hood

Going on 17 years, although it seems just like yesterday since I started at Hood.

Your research is focused on a really interesting topic—pain, suffering and violence in medieval Germany. What drew you to this area?

My research was focused on pain, suffering and violence in medieval Germany. While I am still interested in these topics—for instance, I am co-editing a volume of essays on Endtimes and the Apocalypse in Medieval German Literary Culture—I have been working extensively on the relationship between architecture and memory, specifically the castle and memory. I am interested in how constructing space shapes cultural identity and contributes to the collective memory of a culture. Each society has important spaces in which stories are shared and memories are created. This is ultimately an ideological process, as whoever controls these spaces controls the narrative, whether or not that narrative is entirely true, which means that these spaces are often fraught with tension. One only has to think about the hotly-debated Confederate Civil War memorials in the United States, which were erected to celebrate confederate war heroes and to propagate the idea that the Confederate cause was a just one, while erasing the memory of slavery and all the suffering that went along with it.

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