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Hood College Takes Computer Science Education Week to FCPS

To celebrate Computer Science Education Week, Hood College computer science faculty, along with undergraduate and graduate students, visited schools in the Frederick County Public School District to work with teachers and students during several Hour of Code school events Dec. 4-10.

They taught more than 600 students in 23 classes, which included business, foundations of technology, introduction to computer science, Microsoft certification and AP computer science. The lessons served three purposes: expose students to coding to demystify the idea that coding is difficult or scary; teach computational thinking, or composing problems and forming step-by-step solutions; and help try to decrease the gender gap in computer science.

Brunswick High School, Governor Thomas Johnson High School, Governor Thomas Johnson Middle School, Middletown High School, Oakdale High School and Walkersville High School welcomed Hood into their classrooms.

Hood computer science faculty members Carol Jim, William Crum, Ahmed Salem, Aijuan Dong, John Boon, Khalid Lateef and George Dimitoglou, along with undergraduate students Mickayla Bachar ’19, Karen Canas ’18 and Brandon Ubiera ’19 and graduate students Jeff Larson and Abdul Mir participated in the instruction.

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Phil Berneberg and Alex Jarnot discuss the structural details of ceramic glazes while viewing them with the SEM.
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Meagan Anders, a current Coastal Studies student, examines a locally collected pollen sample to document its structure.
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Pollen comes in all shapes and sizes. With the use of our SEM, we are beginning to study this diversity first hand.
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By Drew Ferrier, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provides a close-up look of the world around us. Hood’s Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies is fortunate to have acquired such an instrument and offers it for use by students and professors from all disciplines.

While a traditional light microscope can magnify objects up to 1000 times, our SEM is capable of zooming in to see fine structural details at 30,000x or more! Unlike most types of microscopes, a SEM uses an electron beam to illuminate the surface of a specimen, rather transmitting images by passing electrons through the sample. Certainly microscopes are used every day in biology classes, but did you know that at Hood electron microscopy can be used by students and faculty from a variety of disciplines to inform their studies?

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Jenni Davis of the Nature Conservancy helps Coastal student Colin Johnson transfer a butterfly from his aerial net to a temporary holding container.
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A captured Monarch awaiting its tag.
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This Monarch has been processed and tagged. It’s now ready for release.
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By Drew Ferrier, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies

Have you seen any Monarch butterflies recently?  Not long ago they were one of the most common butterfly species in our region, but their numbers have declined by about 80 percent in recent years. During winter 2016-17, the official population estimate of butterflies in Mexico, where the species congregates over the winter months, was 146 million Monarchs, compared to a long-term average of 300 million, and a peak of 1 billion in the mid-1990s.

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Nate Purser dissects an oyster – the first step in assessing the presence of disease in our samples.
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Histotechnologist, Stuart Lehmann, explains the operation of a programmable tissue dehydrator and paraffin embedding station.
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Matt Jolly tries his hand at embedding an oyster tissue sample in paraffin.
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Chris Dungan explains the way in which prepared tissues are analyzed microscopically. In this video view, parasitic cells are present in the lining of a cross-section of the oyster gut.
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By Drew Ferrier, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies

The oysters of the Chesapeake Bay are an important commercial species, a linchpin in the waterman’s livelihood, and a keystone organism in the Bay’s ecology. Unfortunately, for the last three decades oyster populations have declined to an estimated one to two percent of historic levels.  One reason for the decline is parasitic disease that can be lethal to oyster populations already under environmental stress.

Last week the students enrolled in our Coastal Studies Semester spent time at the Oxford Cooperative Laboratory on Maryland’s Eastern Shore to learn more about these diseases and the methods that are used to study them. Chris Dungan, a pathologist and research scientist at the lab, provided an overview of the parasites inhabiting oysters, their life histories, and the impacts that they have on the Bay’s oyster populations. Following this introduction, the students began a morning of hands-on learning in the histology laboratories operated by Chris’s team of biologists and technicians. Students were able to take part in the processing of oysters to assess disease prevalence and intensity.

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Many don’t know that the College has an official flower–Hemerocallis Hood College, the Hood College daylily. Over the years the plants had disappeared from the campus landscape, but today they were proudly returned to their rightful home.

In planning for Hood’s 125th anniversary, conversations began about bringing back the daylily. With the assistance of daylily enthusiast and alumna Joanne McDonald Huff ’79, College representatives were connected with another local daylily aficionado, Marnie Roberts, who generously offered to donate some of her plants to Hood.

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Derrick and Dylan Wood
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Phoebe Hassaine-Bennet and Matt Hassaine.
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Chloe and Rebecca Jackson
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Shanayah and Sharayah (Shay) Braithwaite
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Christiano and Juliano Pillari
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Those with an eagle eye at our last commencement ceremonies might have thought that they were seeing double. Over and over and over again. Among this year’s graduating seniors were five sets of twins: Shanayah and Sharayah (Shay) Braithwaite; Matt Hassaine and Phoebe Hassaine-Bennett; Chloe and Rebecca Jackson; Christiano and Juliano Pillari; and Derrick and Dylan Wood.

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Survive and Thrive: Tips for Staying Organized in College

Keep a planner. Whether it’s an actual planner or planner app, find what works for you and stick to it! As soon as you get a new assignment or make plans, write it down before you forget.

Annotate your syllabi. Note anything your professor says that could come in handy when it comes time for your next paper or exam. You’ll thank yourself later when you have those hints or extra instructions.

Keep to-do lists. If you write down what you want to accomplish each day you’re much more likely to stick to it. Setting deadlines for yourself is key in keeping yourself on track.

Schedule chores. Laundry, taking out the trash, tidying up your desk, you name it. Pick a day of the week that works with your schedule and make it part of your routine.

Wake up at the same time everyday. With your class schedule you may not have to wake up early everyday, but doing so will help you get into a set routine and avoid feeling like you’ve wasted the morning.

Find your most productive time. Whether it’s early morning or late at night, find when you work best and set aside some of that time each day for productivity and work.

Stock your backpack and pick out your outfit before bed. Save yourself some time in the morning by packing up the books you need and picking out your clothes the night before. 

Find a note-taking system that works. Whatever works for you, make sure you stick to your system. Having everything in the same format in the same place will make notes easier to review later.

Take time to for yourself. Mental health is not just important for staying organized, but for being a balanced and happy person. Make time for whatever helps you destress. And get enough sleep!

Never be too hard on yourself. Remember that everyone makes mistakes. It’s not easy to stay on top of everything going on in your life all the time. Always try your best and celebrate every victory, big or small! Staying organized gets easier with practice.

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10 Packing Hacks and Tips for Conquering College Move-In Day

Pack a first night bag. Pajamas, clothes for the next day, toiletries, etc. Accept the fact that you might not do all your unpacking on night one, and you won’t want to be digging through every bag just to find your toothbrush!

Pack inside anything that you can. Fill up your laundry bin, trash can and even the mini fridge. You have to carry them in anyway, so you might as well fill the space with any odds and ends. Just make sure it’s not too heavy to carry!

Remove bulky packaging. Whether it’s a microwave box or school supplies packaging, you’re going to get rid of it anyway, so do it ahead of time to save some space.

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The Best Places in Frederick

By Mary Milligan ’17

1. Baker Park: It’s free, beautiful, has walking trails and is a good way to avoid walking through downtown on a busy First Saturday when you already enjoyed all the excitement that you can find there.

2. JoJo’s Restaurant and Tap House: If you are looking for the best french fries in Frederick, look no further, because this is where you can get them. Their menu also goes beyond what you would typically find at a restaurant, it’s more than burgers and chicken strips. They offer foods of all varieties and it’s all delicious.

3. First Saturdays: Although, not a specific place in Frederick, the first Saturday of every month (and every Saturday in December) downtown comes alive. Each month something different is featured. My favorite time to go is definitely February for Fire in Ice where a variety of businesses showcase ice sculptures that may or may not be related to what they sell. The best part about the event is that it’s free!

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Adventures of an Idalionite: My Final Week in Cyprus

By Bethany Montague ’18

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Post One: Can You Dig It? An Archaeology Student’s Adventures in Cyprus
Post Two: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Two in Cyprus
Post Three: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Three in Cyprus
Post Four: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Four in Cyprus
Post Five: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Five in Cyprus

This week was spent closing up the site of Lower City South at Idalion. After 25 years of digging, the sites time has finally come to an end. While we are walking away from the site, we want to protect and record as much information as possible so that if archaeologists come back one day in the future they can know as much as we do now. To achieve this, we drew walls and baulks, took measurements on the walls and various stones, covered some walls and structures with mesh, and then covered them in dirt. We also backfilled pits and trenches after filling them with tarp. The process was long and exhausting, but it’s good to know that the site is somewhat protected.

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