Phil Berneberg and Alex Jarnot discuss the structural details of ceramic glazes while viewing them with the SEM.
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Meagan Anders, a current Coastal Studies student, examines a locally collected pollen sample to document its structure.
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Pollen comes in all shapes and sizes. With the use of our SEM, we are beginning to study this diversity first hand.
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By Drew Ferrier, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provides a close-up look of the world around us. Hood’s Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies is fortunate to have acquired such an instrument and offers it for use by students and professors from all disciplines.

While a traditional light microscope can magnify objects up to 1000 times, our SEM is capable of zooming in to see fine structural details at 30,000x or more! Unlike most types of microscopes, a SEM uses an electron beam to illuminate the surface of a specimen, rather transmitting images by passing electrons through the sample. Certainly microscopes are used every day in biology classes, but did you know that at Hood electron microscopy can be used by students and faculty from a variety of disciplines to inform their studies?

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