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Senior Natalie Yeagley Named Most Outstanding Honors Student

Natalie Yeagley, a graduating senior with a double major in art and archaeology and history, won the 2018 Maryland Portz Award for Outstanding Maryland Honors Student.

The Portz Award is given at the annual Maryland Collegiate Honors Council Conference each year, and it recognizes the top honors student from a four-year school and from a two-year school in Maryland.

“Winning the Portz Award was an incredible honor,” said Yeagley. “It is the best kind of acknowledgement of all the work I had done and an affirmation that I am on the right path to realize my future academic goals. I also realize now how lucky I have been to be surrounded by friends and professors who believe in my ability, even when I do not, and who work hard to ensure I am able to grow as a student and as an individual. I cannot overemphasize the role these people have played in my accomplishments.”

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WYPR Broadcasts Live from Hood

By Lindsay Tubbs ’18

On March 27, Hood hosted a local National Public Radio (NPR) station—Baltimore’s 88.1 WYPR—for a live broadcast of “Midday with Tom Hall”. To me, this was particularly exciting, as I am a big fan of WYPR, and “Midday” specifically! I always find myself listening to it between classes, and have had the opportunity to be featured twice on the show as a call-in listener. So when my supervisor in Hood’s Office of Marketing and Communications told me that she would introduce me to Tom Hall at the event, I was thrilled!

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Hood Students Attend the March for Our Lives

By Britnee Reece ’18, station manager for Blazer Radio

Hood College reflects a community, an educational institution, which means we as a student body must have a sense of urgency to keep our family-like environment safe. Our nation’s school systems are no longer a secure and protected environment; mass shootings in the United States have become something that we as a country have become so oddly numb to. “Thoughts and prayers” will not make the changes needed. The mass shooting, which occurred in Florida early February of this year, took place in my home county, Broward County. I knew the high school and I knew people, who had attended there years ago. It truly “hit home” for me. Those students, who had just witnessed friends die and heard gun shots fire in a place they used to feel at home, were strong. They spoke up. They gave me strength. They sparked a movement.

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Callie Fishburn ’18 Named Fulbright Semifinalist

Senior Callie Fishburn has been made a semifinalist for this year’s Fulbright competition!

The Fulbright program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. Congress and the Department of State and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the U.S. and the people of more than 160 countries worldwide. Recipients of Fulbright grants are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement, as well as demonstrated leadership potential in their fields. She will find out sometime this spring whether she is a finalist.

“With the Fulbright I not only hope to earn a master’s degree, but also have eye-opening experiences that broaden my world perspectives,” Fishburn said. “If I receive the Fulbright, I will be studying in Canada at the University of Saskatchewan, and most likely working on a project involving sustainability in indigenous communities within the province. I believe that the project will give me deeper cultural appreciation for native peoples in both Canada and the United States.”

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Intern Intro: Lindsay Tubbs ’18

By Lindsay Tubbs ’18

Hi! I’m Lindsay (class of 2018, Integrated Marketing Communications), and I am very excited to be interning with the Marcom (Marketing and Communications) Office this semester! I was first introduced to the team during a focus group last year, and I am delighted to have the opportunity to work alongside them this semester.

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As I am earning my degree in Integrated Marketing Communications, I am very happy to be interning in this discipline. This past summer, I had the opportunity to intern at Walmart Home Office in Bentonville, Arkansas, where I worked on improving communication strategies within the Merchandising Execution department. This was an awesome experience that allowed me to see firsthand the major importance of proper communication in a corporate setting, as well as to have a taste of the field of merchandising. This semester, I am happy to be back home in Frederick and on campus exploring the role of a marketer at Hood!

As I am a transfer student and Frederick resident, Hood has been the perfect fit to enable me to reach my academic and professional goals. I deeply appreciate the dedication of Hood professors, and feel that with their guidance and the opportunities that Hood provides, I can achieve anything that I set my mind to. I am thrilled to give back to Hood through my internship, and to play a part in the execution of a fabulous new marketing plan that will aid in increasing enrollment.

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Intern Intro. : Karina Roy ’18

By Karina Roy ’18

I’m Karina and I’m one of the new interns in the Office of Marketing and Communications. I’m majoring in business administration with a concentration in marketing and I’m also double-minoring in studio art and psychology. People always gasp when I say that out loud, but I think being able to study everything you’re interested in is the beauty of going to a liberal arts school.

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Adventures of an Idalionite: My Final Week in Cyprus

By Bethany Montague ’18

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Post One: Can You Dig It? An Archaeology Student’s Adventures in Cyprus
Post Two: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Two in Cyprus
Post Three: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Three in Cyprus
Post Four: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Four in Cyprus
Post Five: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Five in Cyprus

This week was spent closing up the site of Lower City South at Idalion. After 25 years of digging, the sites time has finally come to an end. While we are walking away from the site, we want to protect and record as much information as possible so that if archaeologists come back one day in the future they can know as much as we do now. To achieve this, we drew walls and baulks, took measurements on the walls and various stones, covered some walls and structures with mesh, and then covered them in dirt. We also backfilled pits and trenches after filling them with tarp. The process was long and exhausting, but it’s good to know that the site is somewhat protected.

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Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Five in Cyprus

By Bethany Montague ’18

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Post One: Can You Dig It? An Archaeology Student’s Adventures in Cyprus
Post Two: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Two in Cyprus
Post Three: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Three in Cyprus
Post Four: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Four in Cyprus

This week was our final week of digging. It was a fun week, but also a sad one. I constantly changed trenches this week as we scrambled to finish all of our digging projects. I started the week by finishing the dog skeleton, and then moved back to cistern. Connor and I worked together to try and get out as much dirt as possible, but we still couldn’t get half way through the fill. We were covered in dirt and sweat by the end, but it was a ton of fun. From there, I worked with Becca on a small baulk, which we finished in two days, and then took out a whole area of soft fill soil in a trench in a day. It was down to the last minute, but we were able to finish everything in time.

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Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Four in Cyprus

By Bethany Montague ’18

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Post One: Can You Dig It? An Archaeology Student’s Adventures in Cyprus
Post Two: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Two in Cyprus
Post Three: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Three in Cyprus

This week was possibly the most exciting week of my archaeological career. While working on the baulk with Becca, we uncovered a dog skull, which turned out to be a whole dog skeleton. Unfortunately, we didn’t realize it was a full dog until we removed the skull, but nonetheless the whole experience was very exciting. It has always been a dream of mine to excavate a skeleton and Becca was more than happy to let me work on the dog. It was a very slow, tedious project, but worth it. I had to use dental picks to remove dirt carefully around the skeleton, and then use small paintbrushes to sweep up the dirt.

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Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Three in Cyprus

By Bethany Montague ’18

In case you missed the previous posts: 
Post One: Can You Dig It? An Archaeology Student’s Adventures in Cyprus
Post Two: Adventures of an Idalionite: Week Two in Cyprus

One would think that digging floors would be fun. One would be wrong. I spent the majority of my work this week removing floors and subfloors from my baulk. It is a very slow, tedious, repetitious process. When you first find the floor, you have to sweep, take pictures, and elevations. After that you can excavate the floor, but once it is gone, you have to repeat the same process with the subfloor. Once you remove the subfloor, you must repeat the process again. If you’re lucky, there won’t be any more floors, but if you’re me, you’ll have floors on floors on floors.

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