Screen Shot 2018-04-06 at 4.38.31 PM

Alumni at Leidos Biomedical | Lauren Procter ’08, M.S. ’17

Now in her ninth year at the company, Lauren Procter first found her way to Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. during her senior year when she completed an independent study with professor of biology Craig Laufer, Ph.D.

“I gained hands-on research experience while supporting Dr. Laufer’s research on pectinolytic enzymes for biofuel production from sugar beet pulp,” she said. “Nearing graduation, I spoke to Dr. Laufer about career paths and he was able to connect me with Dr. Dominic Esposito, a scientist at Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly, SAIC-Frederick).”

Read more…

Screen Shot 2018-04-09 at 10.55.49 AM

The Last Word | Drew Ferrier on the Health of the Chesapeake Bay

By Drew Ferrier, professor of biology and the director of the Coastal Studies Program at Hood College

You’ve been reading a lot about different jobs within various STEM fields. Many STEM disciplines have characterized the environmental issues that plague the Chesapeake Bay and many are needed to come up with a solution.

First, a little background. Noticeable declines in water quality and important living resources in the 1960s and ’70s prompted in-depth ecological investigations of the Bay. By the mid-1980s, scientists had a very good idea of the primary issue; runoff of fertilizers (nitrogen and phosphorus) and sediments from human activities—such as agriculture and urban and suburban development—enriched the Bay and led to over-growth of floating, microscopic algae. There was too much algae to be processed by filtering organisms like oysters, so the algae sank to the bottom, and was decomposed by bacteria, consuming all of the water’s dissolved oxygen. In turn, these damaged bottom habitats, as well as parasitic diseases, turbid water and over-harvesting, contributed to the decline of iconic organisms that we associate with the Bay such as blue crabs, striped bass and oysters.

Read more…

Screen Shot 2018-04-09 at 9.54.33 AM

Q&A with Scott Pincikowski

Time at Hood

Going on 17 years, although it seems just like yesterday since I started at Hood.

Your research is focused on a really interesting topic—pain, suffering and violence in medieval Germany. What drew you to this area?

My research was focused on pain, suffering and violence in medieval Germany. While I am still interested in these topics—for instance, I am co-editing a volume of essays on Endtimes and the Apocalypse in Medieval German Literary Culture—I have been working extensively on the relationship between architecture and memory, specifically the castle and memory. I am interested in how constructing space shapes cultural identity and contributes to the collective memory of a culture. Each society has important spaces in which stories are shared and memories are created. This is ultimately an ideological process, as whoever controls these spaces controls the narrative, whether or not that narrative is entirely true, which means that these spaces are often fraught with tension. One only has to think about the hotly-debated Confederate Civil War memorials in the United States, which were erected to celebrate confederate war heroes and to propagate the idea that the Confederate cause was a just one, while erasing the memory of slavery and all the suffering that went along with it.

Read more…

IMG_0563

Hood Students Attend the March for Our Lives

By Britnee Reece ’18, station manager for Blazer Radio

Hood College reflects a community, an educational institution, which means we as a student body must have a sense of urgency to keep our family-like environment safe. Our nation’s school systems are no longer a secure and protected environment; mass shootings in the United States have become something that we as a country have become so oddly numb to. “Thoughts and prayers” will not make the changes needed. The mass shooting, which occurred in Florida early February of this year, took place in my home county, Broward County. I knew the high school and I knew people, who had attended there years ago. It truly “hit home” for me. Those students, who had just witnessed friends die and heard gun shots fire in a place they used to feel at home, were strong. They spoke up. They gave me strength. They sparked a movement.

Read more…

Global Adventures in Public Health

Nicole Hoff ’07 talks about her epidemiological research in the Congo.

Screen Shot 2018-04-09 at 10.44.50 AM

Hood’s First Chair of the Board Scholars | Chelsey Adedoyin ’21

By Lindsay Tubbs ’18

For Chelsey Adedoyin, the uniqueness of Hood’s campus was the selling point.

“The buildings, the green…wow this campus is beautiful!” Chelsey said of her first impressions of Hood. The Laurel, Maryland, native knew about Hood from a high school friend who played in basketball tournaments on campus.

She also knew the close-knit campus was something she wanted.

“I love the small class sizes. I find that I excel when I can have a closer relationship with my professors,” she said. “The Hood community is really my favorite part of being here. Everyone knows each other, as opposed to a big school, where I don’t know anyone, no one knows me and maybe I don’t even know my teacher. That would be crazy.”

Read more…

Screen Shot 2018-04-09 at 10.21.42 AM

Hood’s First Chair of the Board Scholars | Natalie Kolosieke ’21

By Lindsay Tubbs ’18

Natalie Kolosieke ’21 of Greensboro, North Carolina, aspires to have a career in the nonprofit sector and “make the world better” after honing her management skills at Hood.

“The types of nonprofits I’m looking at are more education, or women,” she shared. “Those are things that I’m really passionate about. I want to start working at a nonprofit, and if I really enjoy it, I may decide I want to start one.”

Natalie, whose father works for Habitat for Humanity, loves volunteering there and seeing the difference that she can make.

Read more…

Screen Shot 2018-04-09 at 10.21.27 AM

Hood’s First Chair of the Board Scholars | Grace Weaver ’21

By Lindsay Tubbs ’18

Grace Weaver ’21 of New Market, Maryland, has a very clear vision of her future, aspiring to be a divorce lawyer in Miami.

“I just love the warm weather, and I figured that Miami is such a big city that there’s got to be someone getting divorced,” she explains. “Since third grade, my dad would tell me, ‘You’re gonna be a great lawyer, Grace,’ because I play devil’s advocate in a lot of discussions. I like to argue because I want to see different points.”

In high school, Grace had the chance to practice this passion through the mock trial club with her favorite teacher, Natalie Rebetsky, a 1985 Hood alumna who was in charge of the club. Grace joined and fell in love with it.

Read more…

Screen Shot 2018-04-09 at 10.21.09 AM

Hood’s First Chair of the Board Scholars | Jenna Frick ’21

By Lindsay Tubbs ’18

Had it not been for the offer of the Chair of the Board scholarship, Jenna Frick might not have visited Hood, but the business major from Clermont, Florida, thought it was such a great opportunity she needed to explore it.

“I learned about Hood and applied because the golf coach (Chelsea Danel) had reached out to me,” Jenna said, “but I wasn’t sure I wanted to move this far away from home, and after I got accepted, I hadn’t thought about it much. Then I got the call about applying for the scholarship.”

Read more…

Screen Shot 2018-04-09 at 10.20.53 AM

Hood’s First Chair of the Board Scholars | Caylee Winpigler ’21

By Lindsay Tubbs ’18

“My goal in life is to do something that impacts people, and I want to make a difference,” said Caylee Winpigler ’21 of Walkersville, Maryland.

She is considering a history and political science double major and an English minor.

“I have time still to decide, but I feel like if I go down maybe the political science route, it’ll lead me somewhere that I will be able to make an impact,” she said. “I thought for a while that I could be a lobbyist for environmental science.”

Read more…