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Explore Sydney with Nailah Russell ’18 via Instagram

Nailah Russell ’18 is studying in Sydney, Australia this fall! She’s filling our new study abroad Instagram account with all her adventures. Make sure you follow @hoodabroad!

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Jenni Davis of the Nature Conservancy helps Coastal student Colin Johnson transfer a butterfly from his aerial net to a temporary holding container.
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A captured Monarch awaiting its tag.
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This Monarch has been processed and tagged. It’s now ready for release.
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By Drew Ferrier, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies

Have you seen any Monarch butterflies recently?  Not long ago they were one of the most common butterfly species in our region, but their numbers have declined by about 80 percent in recent years. During winter 2016-17, the official population estimate of butterflies in Mexico, where the species congregates over the winter months, was 146 million Monarchs, compared to a long-term average of 300 million, and a peak of 1 billion in the mid-1990s.

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Nate Purser dissects an oyster – the first step in assessing the presence of disease in our samples.
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Histotechnologist, Stuart Lehmann, explains the operation of a programmable tissue dehydrator and paraffin embedding station.
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Matt Jolly tries his hand at embedding an oyster tissue sample in paraffin.
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Chris Dungan explains the way in which prepared tissues are analyzed microscopically. In this video view, parasitic cells are present in the lining of a cross-section of the oyster gut.
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By Drew Ferrier, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies

The oysters of the Chesapeake Bay are an important commercial species, a linchpin in the waterman’s livelihood, and a keystone organism in the Bay’s ecology. Unfortunately, for the last three decades oyster populations have declined to an estimated one to two percent of historic levels.  One reason for the decline is parasitic disease that can be lethal to oyster populations already under environmental stress.

Last week the students enrolled in our Coastal Studies Semester spent time at the Oxford Cooperative Laboratory on Maryland’s Eastern Shore to learn more about these diseases and the methods that are used to study them. Chris Dungan, a pathologist and research scientist at the lab, provided an overview of the parasites inhabiting oysters, their life histories, and the impacts that they have on the Bay’s oyster populations. Following this introduction, the students began a morning of hands-on learning in the histology laboratories operated by Chris’s team of biologists and technicians. Students were able to take part in the processing of oysters to assess disease prevalence and intensity.

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Intern Intro. : Karina Roy ’18

By Karina Roy ’18

I’m Karina and I’m one of the new interns in the Office of Marketing and Communications. I’m majoring in business administration with a concentration in marketing and I’m also double-minoring in studio art and psychology. People always gasp when I say that out loud, but I think being able to study everything you’re interested in is the beauty of going to a liberal arts school.

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By Connie Ray, Growing for a Healthy Future Project Coordinator, Campus Compact Mid-Atlantic AmeriCorps VISTA, Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies

If you were to visit the Religious Coalition for Human Needs (RCEHN) on DeGrange Street two weeks ago, you’d have found a large, empty lot behind the main building. If you visit it today, however, you will find two large, raised garden beds, 4 feet wide, 8 feet long, and 3 feet high.

These are not your average, run-of-the-mill garden beds, either. These are the realization of an innovative design that directly irrigates the gardens from rooftop runoff that would otherwise run into local streams and pollute our water supply. Instead, the building’s runoff will now be used to grow vegetables for residents of the homeless shelter.

These beds were constructed on Wednesday, Sept. 20 (in 86-degree heat, no less) thanks to the efforts of 16 dedicated volunteers, including six Hood College students, five Aramark employee volunteers, a regular volunteer at the Religious Coalition, three staff/faculty from Hood College, and a Campus Compact Mid-Atlantic AmeriCorps VISTA.

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Many don’t know that the College has an official flower–Hemerocallis Hood College, the Hood College daylily. Over the years the plants had disappeared from the campus landscape, but today they were proudly returned to their rightful home.

In planning for Hood’s 125th anniversary, conversations began about bringing back the daylily. With the assistance of daylily enthusiast and alumna Joanne McDonald Huff ’79, College representatives were connected with another local daylily aficionado, Marnie Roberts, who generously offered to donate some of her plants to Hood.

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We believe in the power of kindness!

To support the new strategic plan’s pillar of Strengthening the Hood Community, we’re making an effort to practice more random acts of kindness.

Here’s one submitted by Jamie Shopland of the Class of 2012.

On Wednesday, 8/23, I stopped at Bebe by the mall for a pedicure. I got to chatting with my pedicure technician and she said she was having difficulty finding a piano instructor for her 5-year-old daughter. I texted a friend whose kids had lessons when they were younger in hopes she’d have a recommendation. She replied that their instructor had retired, but suggested contacting Hood. While I was in the chair, I Googled ‘Hood College piano lessons’ and sure enough, the top search result was to Hood College’s Preparatory Music Division! I had no idea my alma mater offered private lessons. Still in the chair, I pulled a random piece of paper and pen out of my purse to write down contact information for Ms. Lester. As we were walking to the front of the salon, I handed her the contact information I had jotted down and told her to give it a try. She smiled broadly, thanked me, and said I was so nice. As I checked out, she thanked me again and I told her I hoped it worked out.

—Jamie ’12

Help us get to 125…or more. Submit a random act of kindness online and we’ll compile a list.

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Derrick and Dylan Wood
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Phoebe Hassaine-Bennet and Matt Hassaine.
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Chloe and Rebecca Jackson
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Shanayah and Sharayah (Shay) Braithwaite
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Christiano and Juliano Pillari
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Those with an eagle eye at our last commencement ceremonies might have thought that they were seeing double. Over and over and over again. Among this year’s graduating seniors were five sets of twins: Shanayah and Sharayah (Shay) Braithwaite; Matt Hassaine and Phoebe Hassaine-Bennett; Chloe and Rebecca Jackson; Christiano and Juliano Pillari; and Derrick and Dylan Wood.

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By Sarah Tapscott ’15

In July 2017 I had the opportunity to go to Dublin, Ireland for a week and sing at Christ Church Cathedral with the Choral Arts Society of Frederick, directed by Hood’s choir director, Lynn Staininger. We were invited by MCI (Music Celebrations International), which provides opportunities for musical performances around the world! I love to travel and hadn’t gone to Europe since my freshman year at Hood, so I knew I had to go! What made this experience special was the ability to share it with fellow Hood alumni in Choral Arts. Of the thirty-five vocalists that went, five amazing Hood alum women sang alongside me: Marivic Sison ’94, M.A.’00, Michelle Sison ’97, Jessica Kehler Miller ’11, Meghan Tomlin ’11, and Jordan Garvey ’14. Even my boyfriend, Owen Rosier ’16, came along to experience it with us!

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Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity Master’s Degree Approved

by George Dimitoglou, Associate Professor of Computer Science

The Maryland Higher Education Commission has approved our new Master of Science in Cybersecurity, and there is a lot of excitement about the career opportunities it will give our students.

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