MICUA congratulates Hood College on its 125 years of service and leadership: A Letter from MICUA’s President

Originally posted here

The Maryland Independent College & University Association (MICUA) congratulates Hood College on its 125 years of service and leadership as an outstanding institution of higher learning in the liberal arts tradition.

Read more…

DSC_4769

Why I Chose Hood Again

By Ingrid Gooch ’16

When I was a senior at Hood College, I received the incredible news that I had been nominated for The Best of Hood. My beloved alma mater, one of the top liberal arts colleges, considered me one of its most outstanding constituents.  I was overwhelmed, and tremendously honored.

Several academic experiences at Hood have stayed with me in my post-baccalaureate career. During a year-long fellowship with the National Institute of Health (NIH) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), I was introduced to the leading health disparity research. The overwhelming majority of research on effective means of reducing disparities involves application of Bronfenbrenner’s ecological systems theory, a concept with which I have been fascinated since I first studied it in Survey of Clinical, Community, and Counseling Psychology with Dr. Wanda Ruffin. Not only have I continued to reference this theory when discussing health issues in my non-professional life, but its widespread application among top scientists at NIH demonstrates the incredible value of holding a degree in psychology from Hood College. Of course, the psychology department offers its students even more than the exemplary coursework! My scientific career truly began with Dr. Elizabeth MacDougall in her Geriatric Assessment Research Lab (GARL). The lab offers its students applied training opportunities in which they gain experience and insight into real, scientific experience (survey data acquisition, data analysis, manuscript preparation, poster preparation, and so forth). The department’s genuine care for students’ success and well-being is unmatched.

Read more…

Intern Intro: Lindsay Tubbs ’18

By Lindsay Tubbs ’18

Hi! I’m Lindsay (class of 2018, Integrated Marketing Communications), and I am very excited to be interning with the Marcom (Marketing and Communications) Office this semester! I was first introduced to the team during a focus group last year, and I am delighted to have the opportunity to work alongside them this semester.

Headshot

As I am earning my degree in Integrated Marketing Communications, I am very happy to be interning in this discipline. This past summer, I had the opportunity to intern at Walmart Home Office in Bentonville, Arkansas, where I worked on improving communication strategies within the Merchandising Execution department. This was an awesome experience that allowed me to see firsthand the major importance of proper communication in a corporate setting, as well as to have a taste of the field of merchandising. This semester, I am happy to be back home in Frederick and on campus exploring the role of a marketer at Hood!

As I am a transfer student and Frederick resident, Hood has been the perfect fit to enable me to reach my academic and professional goals. I deeply appreciate the dedication of Hood professors, and feel that with their guidance and the opportunities that Hood provides, I can achieve anything that I set my mind to. I am thrilled to give back to Hood through my internship, and to play a part in the execution of a fabulous new marketing plan that will aid in increasing enrollment.

Read more…

Marisel and her daughter, Paula Del Valle Torres '18.
Thank you
Trip 3
Trip 2
Trip 1

In an effort to support Puerto Rico in its recovery from Hurricane Maria, which smashed through the island on Sept. 20, Hood faculty and staff donated several car loads of food and supplies. They were delivered to Unity in Frederick Friday and are now on their way to help those impacted by the devastation.

We’re sharing an email from Marisel N. Torres-Crespo, Ph.D., assistant professor of education and director of Onica Prall Child Development Lab School. Thank you, Marisel, for reminding us that a little help and kindness can go a long way.

Read more…

Screen Shot 2017-10-02 at 2.32.51 PM

Explore Sydney with Nailah Russell ’18 via Instagram

Nailah Russell ’18 is studying in Sydney, Australia this fall! She’s filling our new study abroad Instagram account with all her adventures. Make sure you follow @hoodabroad!

Read more…

Jenni Davis of the Nature Conservancy helps Coastal student Colin Johnson transfer a butterfly from his aerial net to a temporary holding container.
Screen Shot 2017-10-03 at 4.13.32 PM
A captured Monarch awaiting its tag.
Screen Shot 2017-10-03 at 4.13.42 PM
This Monarch has been processed and tagged. It’s now ready for release.
Screen Shot 2017-10-03 at 4.14.00 PM

By Drew Ferrier, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies

Have you seen any Monarch butterflies recently?  Not long ago they were one of the most common butterfly species in our region, but their numbers have declined by about 80 percent in recent years. During winter 2016-17, the official population estimate of butterflies in Mexico, where the species congregates over the winter months, was 146 million Monarchs, compared to a long-term average of 300 million, and a peak of 1 billion in the mid-1990s.

Read more…

Nate Purser dissects an oyster – the first step in assessing the presence of disease in our samples.
Screen Shot 2017-10-03 at 2.32.02 PM
Histotechnologist, Stuart Lehmann, explains the operation of a programmable tissue dehydrator and paraffin embedding station.
Screen Shot 2017-10-03 at 2.32.14 PM
Matt Jolly tries his hand at embedding an oyster tissue sample in paraffin.
Screen Shot 2017-10-03 at 2.32.25 PM
Chris Dungan explains the way in which prepared tissues are analyzed microscopically. In this video view, parasitic cells are present in the lining of a cross-section of the oyster gut.
Screen Shot 2017-10-03 at 2.32.37 PM

By Drew Ferrier, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Director of the Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies

The oysters of the Chesapeake Bay are an important commercial species, a linchpin in the waterman’s livelihood, and a keystone organism in the Bay’s ecology. Unfortunately, for the last three decades oyster populations have declined to an estimated one to two percent of historic levels.  One reason for the decline is parasitic disease that can be lethal to oyster populations already under environmental stress.

Last week the students enrolled in our Coastal Studies Semester spent time at the Oxford Cooperative Laboratory on Maryland’s Eastern Shore to learn more about these diseases and the methods that are used to study them. Chris Dungan, a pathologist and research scientist at the lab, provided an overview of the parasites inhabiting oysters, their life histories, and the impacts that they have on the Bay’s oyster populations. Following this introduction, the students began a morning of hands-on learning in the histology laboratories operated by Chris’s team of biologists and technicians. Students were able to take part in the processing of oysters to assess disease prevalence and intensity.

Read more…

Screen Shot 2017-09-27 at 4.37.32 PM

Intern Intro. : Karina Roy ’18

By Karina Roy ’18

I’m Karina and I’m one of the new interns in the Office of Marketing and Communications. I’m majoring in business administration with a concentration in marketing and I’m also double-minoring in studio art and psychology. People always gasp when I say that out loud, but I think being able to study everything you’re interested in is the beauty of going to a liberal arts school.

Read more…

IMG_0977
IMG_0981
IMG_0982
IMG_0985
IMG_0986
IMG_0987
IMG_0988
IMG_0989
IMG_5463
IMG_5465
IMG_5466
IMG_5468
IMG_5469
IMG_5470
IMG_5471
IMG_5472
IMG_5473
IMG_5474
IMG_5476
IMG_5478
IMG_5480
IMG_5481
IMG_5482
IMG_5483
IMG_5485
IMG_5487
IMG_5492

By Connie Ray, Growing for a Healthy Future Project Coordinator, Campus Compact Mid-Atlantic AmeriCorps VISTA, Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies

If you were to visit the Religious Coalition for Human Needs (RCEHN) on DeGrange Street two weeks ago, you’d have found a large, empty lot behind the main building. If you visit it today, however, you will find two large, raised garden beds, 4 feet wide, 8 feet long, and 3 feet high.

These are not your average, run-of-the-mill garden beds, either. These are the realization of an innovative design that directly irrigates the gardens from rooftop runoff that would otherwise run into local streams and pollute our water supply. Instead, the building’s runoff will now be used to grow vegetables for residents of the homeless shelter.

These beds were constructed on Wednesday, Sept. 20 (in 86-degree heat, no less) thanks to the efforts of 16 dedicated volunteers, including six Hood College students, five Aramark employee volunteers, a regular volunteer at the Religious Coalition, three staff/faculty from Hood College, and a Campus Compact Mid-Atlantic AmeriCorps VISTA.

Read more…

DSC_8086
DSC_8038
DSC_8097

Many don’t know that the College has an official flower–Hemerocallis Hood College, the Hood College daylily. Over the years the plants had disappeared from the campus landscape, but today they were proudly returned to their rightful home.

In planning for Hood’s 125th anniversary, conversations began about bringing back the daylily. With the assistance of daylily enthusiast and alumna Joanne McDonald Huff ’79, College representatives were connected with another local daylily aficionado, Marnie Roberts, who generously offered to donate some of her plants to Hood.

Read more…